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California Obituary and Death Notice Archive

California Obituary and Death Notice Archive - Page 475

Posted By: GenLookups.com
Date: Saturday, 27 September 2014, at 10:15 a.m.

Jerome Lawrence

Malibu resident and co-author of "Inherit the Wind" Jerome Lawrence died on Sunday from complications related to a stroke he suffered a year and a half ago. He was 88.

Lawrence collaborated with Robert E. Lee to create some of American theater's most popular works, including the 1955 play, "Inherit the Wind," which was based on the 1925 trial of John Scopes, the Tennessee school teacher convicted of teaching evolution. Their other famous works include "The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail" and the musical "Mame."

"He was the most wonderful person that any of us ever knew," said Will Willoughby, who has lived in Lawrence's home for the past 15 years. "He was a great man. He opened his house and his life to many people."

An Ohio native, Lawrence worked as a reporter at the Wilkington News Journal and New Lexington Daily News in his home state. He joined CBS radio as a staff writer in 1939. He was also co-founder of Armed Forces Radio.

Lawrence had lived in Malibu since the 1940s, and he moved into his Las Flores Mesa home in 1970. It was burned down in the 1993 fire, and then rebuilt.

Lawrence, who graduated cum laude from Ohio State University, has served on the boards of directors of the American Conservatory Theatre, the National Repertory Theatre, the Dramatist Guild, the Writers Guild of America, and the Authors Guild of America. He was also named to the national Theatre Hall of Fame in 1990.

He was recognized with numerous awards, including the Donaldson Award, two Peabody Awards for distinguished Achievement in Broadcasting and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Theatre Association.

Douglas L. Forde

Dr. Douglas Forde died at home on Feb. 1, 2004. He was 84. Dr. Forde was born in Clinton, Ontario, Canada. He moved to the beach in 1944 and lived in Malibu Colony until 1990 when he and his wife, Jo Giese, moved to Broad Beach.

He attended the University of Southern California Medical School and built a practice in the Pacific Palisades and Santa Monica.

His guideline as a physician was, "If you listen, the patient will tell you what's wrong. If you listen hard enough, they will tell you how to treat it."

Forde co-authored the classic text, "Interviewing and Patient Care." Up until the last year of his life, he continued studying French and playing the piano. The week before he died, he had his last piano lesson.

He is survived by his wife, sons Douglas and Gregory, and granddaughter Amy.

An open memorial celebration will take place Feb. 22, 4 p.m., at the Malibu West Beach Club, 30756 Pacific Coast Highway. Attendees are requested to arrive by 3:45 p.m., wear a splash of red, beach shoes and to bring a warm jacket. R.S.V.P. by Feb. 17 to the Millers at 310.829.1554.

Donations can be made in Forde's memory to the Keck School of Medicine at USC/ICM Program Fund, 1320 San Pablo St., PMB A-301, Los Angeles, CA, 90033.

William N. Stivers

William "Bill" N. Stivers died Nov. 30, 2004 from natural causes. He was 86.

From 1962 through 2000, Stivers worked at Pepperdine University as a professor and coordinator of modern languages. He was one of the original elders at the Malibu Church of Christ, now the University Church of Christ, serving for 40 years. For many years he offered free Spanish classes to the Malibu community, of which he was a resident for more than 30 years. Stivers also was greatly involved in Camp Stivers, a mission in San Felipe, Mexico that was named for his dedication and benevolence for the Spanish speaking people of Mexico, the United States and Central America.

Stivers was born in Amarillo, Texas, in 1918. His family moved to California when he was two years old. Stivers attended Pepperdine College, while teaching Bible class at the only Spanish-speaking congregation in Los Angeles. He served in the military during World War II, later returning to Southern California to earn his master's degree from USC. Stivers then went on to Quito, Ecuador to attend Central University of Quito, earning his doctorate.

In 1947, Stivers married Frances Novak of Wichita, Kan. She worked at Pepperdine in the library for 10 years and then in the admissions office for 20 years. Stivers served for 10 years as chief deputy to the late Kenneth Hahn, who was then a Los Angeles County supervisor. Stivers was on the boards of the Spastic Children's Foundation, East Los Angeles Hospital and the Baxter Institute in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. He is the author of several books of stories and legends of Spanish-speaking peoples.

Stivers is survived by his wife of 57 years, his daughter, Nina, his son, Chris, his daughter-in-law, Sandy and three grandchildren. Stivers was preceded in death by his son, Stephen.

A memorial service is planned for Saturday, Dec. 11, at 1 p.m. in Elkins Auditorium on the Pepperdine campus.

Wendy Herold Hayman

Wendy Herold Hayman died Dec. 24, 2005, one week after collapsing and never regaining consciousness. She was 77.

Hayman was born in the small fishing village of Wanchese, N.C. on April 18, 1927. Her mother and father, Edna Daniels Hayman and Horace G. Hayman, sailed home to Wanchese from New York City to have their daughter delivered. While young she spent summer months living with her Granddad, Oscar "Pop Oss" Daniels, at one of several Outer Banks, N.C. lighthouses. Hayman attended elementary school at the old Wanchese schoolhouse. At the College of William and Mary, she majored in journalism and art.

Hayman's early ballet dance lessons later developed into a budding career, as she became an understudy in the New York City Ballet Company for ballerina Maria Tallchief. She wrote and illustrated many children's books and did fashion illustrations for a local paper. Later, Hayman, and her son, Scott Paul Herold, spent time in Europe, where she did research work for the State Department during the Kennedy administration.

Upon returning to the United States, Hayman became public relations director for Macy's in Akron, Ohio, and was later promoted to the same job for Macy's in San Francisco. Hayman returned briefly to North Carolina to teach special education at Manteo High School.

In 1973, Hayman moved to San Diego, where she met Bud Hower and married him on Sept. 24, 1978. The couple moved to Malibu in 1979 and have lived here ever since. Hayman became interested once again in painting. Hayman was a member and former president of the Malibu Art Association. She was active in the Malibu Republican Club, and founded the Malibu Republician Women, Federated. Her artwork was displayed at many local showings and received several "best of show" awards.

Hayman is survived by her husband, son, grandson, John Paul Herold, sister, Wanda Sposeto, nieces, nephews, cousins, Stewart Bell and Cecilia Bell and step children and step grandchildren. Memorial services will take place at St. Aidan's Church on Jan. 15 at 11 a.m.

Paul Richard Beck

Paul Richard Beck died Dec. 26, 2005. He was 74.

Beck was born in Los Angeles on Nov. 10, 1928 as the only child of Dave and Betty Beck. His father was the proprietor of Dave Beck Auto Parts. Paul Beck said his father was known for "always keeping his word" and taught him the importance of honesty.

In 1935, Beck became the Adorable baby for Adore milk.

Beck worked in many business fields. He wrote for old radio shows such as "Amos And Andy." Also, he was a talent agent, real estate investor, importer/exporter and inventor. Beck also worked in the automotive industry.

Beck invented the one-size-fits-all fan belt. He spent a good part of his later years successfully developing a new fan belt design that can be quickly and easily fabricated on-site for any application or size, eliminating the need for an inventory of multiple sized belts.

Beck is survived by his wife, R. Eve "Delanie" Bryant-Beck. Services are scheduled at Gates, Kingsley & Gates, located at 1925 Arizona Ave. in Santa Monica on Friday at 1 p.m. A remembrance of his life will also take place at Duke's Malibu.

Robert John Sullivan

Robert John Sullivan died from melanoma Monday at his son's home in Calabasas.

Sullivan was a longtime Malibu resident, moving here more than 27 years ago.

He was born in Chicago on May 21, 1923. Sullivan graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1944.

Sullivan served in the Army Air Corps during WWII as a second lieutenant.

Sullivan's lifelong avocation was aviation. He was considered a pioneer in the early days of the development of helicopters. Sullivan retired from Hughes Aircraft as an aeronautical engineer, after working there for 29 years. Previously, he spent a decade employed by Sikorsky Aviation in Connecticut.

In retirement, Sullivan threw himself into volunteer work. He was a lector at Our Lady of Malibu Catholic Church, assisted at the Malibu Library and worked for the Center for Healthy Aging, dropping in on the elderly in Santa Monica to visit.

Sullivan's lifelong passion was reading. He was a member of the Malibu Book Discussion Group that met weekly at the Point Dume Club.

Sullivan was an avid bridge player. He could also be seen taking daily walk on Malibu Road or doing laps at Malibu Bluffs Park.

Survivors include his sons, Barry and Kevin, daughter, Joan Sullivan Shorma, brother, Ed, daughters-in-law, Kathy and Judith, son-in-law, Jerry Shorma and grandchildren, Brian, Sean, Laura Nicole, Diane, Laura Jean, Marie, Julia and Joseph. Sullivan was preceded in death by his wife, Jean Begley Sullivan and his father, John A. Sullivan.

A funeral mass will take place at Our Lady of Malibu Saturday at 11 a.m. An internment service will follow at Holy Cross Cemetery in Culver City.

Janet Hargrave

Monday, January 24, 2005

Janet Hargrave, a Malibu resident of 50 years, died in her Malibu Park home on Jan. 4. She was 84.

Hargrave was born in Portland Ore. on March 27, 1920. Her family moved to Los Angeles when she was still a small child. She graduated from UCLA with a degree in social studies in 1942.

Hargrave's love of adventure brought her to the Army Air Corps in 1943 where she volunteered to become one of only 1,000 members of WASP (Women Air force Service Pilots of WWII) in the 44-W-5 unit. She earned her wings as a pilot, learning to fly in Independence, Calif. Her service entailed flying transport planes across the country during World War II. After the war she ran a flying school in Nashville, soloing many a student. Hargrave then turned to writing about aviation in columns and articles and scripts for WSM Radio.

Returning to the West Coast, Hargrave worked as a social worker in child services. Known for her humor, Hargrave was recognized by her colleagues for her witty manner. In 1955 she bought land in Malibu and built her own home in what was then a rural community.

Hargrave's home became the worldwide headquarters for her wooden clock business, a throwback to the turn-of-the-century crafts embraced by her father and mentor, Palmer Hargrave. After her father's death in 1975, she was determined to continue the high design and craftsmanship of his lighting business. American-made lamps of classic elegance, Palmer Hargrave lamps can be found in many of the finest hotels and homes throughout the world.

After 23 years in the design business, Hargrave retired from business at age 78. But retirement didn't end the adventure; as a sprightly single she traveled the globe to such places as Russia, Alaska, Peru, the American Southwest and the Panama Canal. When at home she always kept herself busy with her yoga, New Yorker and all her animals.

Hargrave's wish was to be buried in an old pine box in the shadow of the Eastern Sierra. On Jan. 8, family and friends who admired and loved her set out on another Janet adventure, a 300-mile journey during the recent storms to lay her to rest in the Mount Whitney Cemetery in Lone Pine, Calif.

A potluck memorial service will take place on Jan. 30 at 2 p.m. For more information, call Cathy at 457.1070.

Douglas Kent Simpson

Wednesday, March 23, 2005

Douglas Kent Simpson, youth advocate, co-founder of the Boys and Girls Club of Malibu and general counsel and director of the Malibu Foundation for Youth and Families, died March 14 of pancreatic cancer at his Malibu home. He was 48.

Simpson was known for his work as an attorney. Most recently, he worked for Rein, Evans & Sestanovich LLP. Previously, he served as executive vice president and general counsel of Card Commerce International Inc. and was a member of the corporate departments of Whitman Breed Abbott & Morgan LLP, where he founded the emerging company technology and finance practice group in the firm's Los Angeles office.

Simpson specialized in work in international business and corporate finance. He represented both established companies and entrepreneurs in capital raising, acquisitions and general business matters in diverse industries, including technology, financial services, entertainment, restaurants, environmental products and others.

Before practicing law, Simpson was a member of the antitrust consulting group at National Economic Research Associates Inc. He was a summer intern at Tokyo Kokusai Law Offices in Tokyo, while attending a program in Japanese law at Tokyo Daigaku (Todai). Simpson received his bachelor's degree in economics from UC Irvine in 1981 and his law degree from the University of San Francisco School of Law in 1985, where he was a member of the Law Review.

Friends said Simpson's passion for the well-being of young people was felt throughout the community in the many activities he participated in. His energy, insight and intelligence helped create the winning concept of the community partnership: bringing the Malibu Foundation for Youth and Families, the Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School District and The Boys and Girls Clubs of America together to build a Teen Center in Malibu.

Simpson was born in Walnut Creek in 1956. He moved with his family to Stamford, Conn. in 1965, then to Malvern, Pa. in 1968, where he attended Conestoga High School. Simpson loved the outdoors and most recently enjoyed sailing in the Santa Monica Bay and walking along the Malibu beaches. Friends said Simpson was a peace seeker who always jumped first to come to someone's aid and never thought of the possible inconvenience to himself.

Simpson is survived by his wife, Rita Dajani Simpson; daughter, Bianca; son, Chase; father, Donald R. Simpson of El Segundo; sisters, Peggy Yockey of Virginia, Patsy Teesdale of Tustin, and Teresa Simpson of El Segundo; brother, Don Simpson of Pasadena and many nieces and nephews.

There will be a memorial service for all friends and family at Simpson's home in Malibu on April 6. Call the Malibu Foundation for Youth and Families for details at 589.8363.

Agnes B. O'Connor

Agnes B. "Aggie" O'Connor, who was active with Our Lady of Malibu, was found dead Feb. 23 in her apartment at Silvercrest, an independent senior residence in Santa Monica. She was 92.

O'Connor was born April 3, 1912 in Philadelphia to George and Mary Schonter. She moved to California in February 1936 and married Harry Edward O'Connor in February 1942 in Hollywood. Agnes O'Connor was an executive secretary at Paramount Studios in the late 1930s and 1940s, working for such luminaries as Cecil B. DeMille. She then became a homemaker for more than 40 years.

O'Connor was an active member of several parishes, including St. Basil's Catholic Church and St. Gregory Nazianzen in Los Angeles, St. Monica's in Santa Monica and Our Lady of Malibu. She was an avid collector, accumulating such things as stamps and teacups. Additionally, O'Connor was a frequent traveler and correspondent.

O'Connor is survived by her two daughters, Maureen de Koff of Malibu and Patricia Phillips of San Diego; sister, Marguerite Emmal; grandsons, Kristofer, Derek and Klarke de Koff and many cousins, nieces and nephews.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Computer Access Center, a nonprofit serving people with disabilities, at P.O. Box 5336, Santa Monica, CA 90409-5336. Donations can also be sent to the Salvation Army, Attn: Col. Calvin Prouty, 1530 Fifth St., Santa Monica, CA 90401.

A funeral mass will take place at Saint Finbar Catholic Church in Burbank on Saturday at 10 a.m.

Robert E. Storms

Robert (Bob) E. Storms died after a brief illness at Santa Monica Hospital on Dec. 8, 2004. He was born in 1918.

Storms was a 70-year Malibu resident and a member of the real estate community. At one time he was active in the Malibu Lions Club and served as an officer in the Malibu chapter of the U.S. Navy League. During World War II, Storms served as a first-class petty officer in the U.S. Coast Guard.

Storms is survived by his wife of 48 years, Lucille and her three children, Michael Sale, Bonnie Fisher and Byron Sale. Storms' ashes will be spread in the Pacific Ocean in front of his home which his wife said will allow him to "keep an eyes on the property for eternity."

Joyce Smart Fante

Wednesday, June 08, 2005

Joyce Smart Fante, a Point Dume resident for 55 years and the widow of the late novelist and screenwriter John Fante, died Tuesday at Ocean Villas Retirement Home in Santa Monica from respiratory failure. She was 91.

Fante, a third-generation Californian and the daughter of Joseph Hutchins Smart, a famed 19th-century Northern California Gold Rush land developer, was a relative of Revolutionary War hero Nathan Hale and one of the first women to attend Stanford University. An editor and published poet before the age of 20, Fante in her later years wrote essays and poetry and edited the work of her husband.

Fante is survived by two sons, Dan and James, a daughter, Victoria Fante Cohen and eight grandchildren.

A service is pending at Our Lady of Malibu Church. Fante will be buried with her late husband at Holy Cross Cemetery in Culver City.

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