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Idaho Obituary and Death Notice Archive

Idaho Obituary and Death Notice Archive - Page 214

Posted By: GenLookups.com
Date: Friday, 28 April 2017, at 7:36 p.m.

Harry Lloyd Roach, 80, Kamiah
Harry (Bud) Roach, beloved husband, father, grandfather and friend, passed away Friday, Sept. 4, 2009, at his Kamiah home, of pancreatic cancer.
He was born Oct. 13, 1928 at Chico, CA, to Charles and Ruth Sheley Roach, and lived there until 1936. The family moved to Potlatch and then Orofino, where he attended school until 1945, then back to Potlatch, where he graduated from high school in 1947. After high school he worked in logging camps and farmed.
Bud married Linda Parks at Cameron on Oct. 22, 1950, and they raised three sons. He served in the Korean War from 1950 to 1952 and received a Purple Heart. Following his service in Korea, he worked on a family farm in Kendrick from 1952 to 1956, then moved to Kamiah and logged for Delbert Roby. In the 1950s, he and Delbert took one of the first raft trips down the Selway River in a rubber raft, and they enjoyed many fishing trips on the main Salmon River, excursions captured for posterity in Del's films.
He co-owned a trucking business with Sig Grove from 1961 to 1966. In 1966, he joined the Carpenter's Union and worked on the construction of Dworshak Dam. After Dworshak was completed, he worked as a millwright at Grand Coulee, Lower Granite, Lower Monumental, and Bonneville; at paper mills including Potlatch Forest Industries in Lewiston and Ponderay Newsprint in Usk, WA; and on natural gas pipelines.
In 1979, he and Linda moved to Clarkston, WA, then returned to Kamiah after he retired in 1995 to be closer to family, especially their grandsons. Bud was a member of the Lewis County Search & Rescue, Eagles, and Faith Lutheran Church, and a tireless volunteer for Kamiah Chamber of Commerce events like Barbecue Days and jet boat races. He helped friends in need, brought roses from his garden to the True Value crew, and was the official family expert orchard/vineyard pruner. He enjoyed watching his grandsons compete (and then coach) in sports; family hunting, fishing, and snowmobiling trips; gardening; fixing almost anything; and serving his family, his church, his community and his country.
Bud is survived by his wife of 59 years, Linda; sons, Dean and Shirley (Wilkins) Roach and Mark and Lorraine (Hingston) Roach of Kamiah, and Mike Roach and Robin Cruz of Caldwell, grandsons Kevin and Wendy (Spangler) Roach of Kingston, Craig Roach of Kamiah, and Paul Roach of Caldwell, and new great-granddaughter Maylee Annika Roach of Kingston, born Sept. 10, 2009. He was preceded in death by his parents, and his sisters Phyllis Roach, Mae Hunteman, and Joyce Warwick.
A graveside service will be held on Saturday, Sept. 19 at 10 a.m. at the Kamiah cemetery, followed by a memorial service at 11 a.m. at St. Catherine's Catholic Church in Kamiah. Lunch will be served in the fellowship hall following the memorial service. Funeral arrangements are being handled by Trenary Funeral Home in Kooskia. The family suggests memorials to Faith Lutheran Church in Kamiah or the Kamiah Ambulance Service.

Emma Elder, 47, Lewiston
Emma Elder, 47, of Lewiston passed away Monday, Sept. 7, 2009, at Tri-State Memorial Hospital in Clarkston, WA of complications due to diabetes.
Emma was born March 14, 1962 at Denton, TX to Greta and Juney Ray Elder. Emma and her family moved to Lewiston when she was six. She graduated from Lewiston High School in 1979. She also worked for several years at Kmart.
She had married Doug Engel and together they had a daughter Serena in 1988. Emma and Doug divorced in 2000.
Emma enjoyed her family more than anything. She enjoyed shopping for her grandchildren, cooking, going to the ocean, reading, thunderstorms, drinking coffee and tea, and most of all, being with her best friend and daughter, Serena.
Emma is survived by her daughter, Serena Engel, and grandchildren Aiden and Ayla of Lewiston; her mother Greta of Orofino; her sisters Juney and Ronnie Jo, and a brother Tom, all of Texas.
She was preceded in death by her father, Juney Ray Elder, and her step-father Bill Cummings.
A memorial service will be held Friday, Sept., 11, at 1 p.m. at Malcom's Brower-Wann Funeral Home in Lewiston.

Lauran A. Kittle, 94
Lauran A. Kittle of Kamiah died Tuesday, Dec. 16, 2008, at Clearwater Valley Hospital in Orofino after a long fight against prostrate cancer.
Born in Loma Linda, CA, Sept. 8, 1914, to Orra and Laura Kittle, Lauran spent most of his childhood exploring the wonders of nature. His parents enjoyed hunting, fishing and photography, and instilled their passion for the great outdoors in Lauran and his eight brothers at an early age.
During the summer break of his junior year at Pacific Union High School, Lauran worked as a ranch hand in Cheyenne, WY. Days were spent tagging cattle, calving and haying; nights were devoted to embellished tales shared with other cowboys over a bottle of whiskey and some grub. The experience would have a lasting impact. After graduating from high school, Lauran went on to pursue his Bachelor's Degree in Animal Husbandry from Oregon State University.
In 1935, after graduating near the top of his class, Lauran and his brother, Val, started a fishing business in Punta Rayas, Costa Rica. Initially, the business flourished, as the low cost of operations translated into big dollars in the U.S. fish market. However, a devastating hurricane wiped out all but two of the boats; fortunately, one of the surviving vessels contained Lauran and his brother. After barely escaping with their lives, the brothers sold off what was left of the business and moved back to the States.
Years later, Lauran found himself working in Los Angeles as an aviation engineer for Douglas Aircraft; a vital role during World War II, but one which he considered unpleasant due to its sedentary nature. After a disappointing two years, he received an invitation from his uncle, Ernie, to visit him in Idaho for a hunting trip. Uncle Ernie took Lauran and his brothers on a three-week excursion through the back woods to hunt the mighty Idaho elk. The experience awakened the woodsman within and shortly after the trip, he returned to Los Angeles, quit his job, packed his things and moved to St. Maries to buy a tree farm. He had rediscovered his passion for the outdoors and spent the next 30 years living his wilderness dream.
After selling his business, Lauran retired from tree farming, but not his life as a woodsman. He spent his time hunting, building furniture and crafting Indian artifacts, many of which were used in local Pow Wows and are currently on display around Clearwater County. Another of his pleasures was wine making. Wines from "Kittle's Kitchen" earned him several county fair awards and undoubtedly served as the inspiration for his off-the-wall toasts, such as "Viva Mexico. Viva Pancho Villa".
Lauran lived out his last days in Orofino, not far from his beloved Kamiah, hiking the trails along the Clearwater River. He loved the people, the land and the enchantment of Native American culture and would not have had it any other way.
Lauran is survived by his daughter, Saundra and her son, Shaun; his niece, Paige and her husband, Tom.
Please join us in a memorial service celebrating Lauran's life on Saturday, Sept. 12, at 11 a.m. at the Kamiah River Park followed by a potluck luncheon at noon. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the National Prostate Foundation.

Robert Jarvis Adams, 90
Robert Jarvis Adams passed away Monday, Aug. 31, 2009, at St. Joseph Regional Medical Center in Lewiston, from age-related complications following hip surgery.
An all-Norwegian cowboy? Oh, yes! Born Sept. 10, 1918 in South Dakota as Rubin Jarvis Odland, his life and main interests mirrored those of his favorite early 1900s "Golden West" author - Will James. Like Will James, he was orphaned at an early age.
Rubin's mother, Gina, died in the terrible flu epidemic of 1918, when he was just 3 months old. After moving west to be closer to the other Odland family members, his father Jake was killed in a car wreck in Centralia, WA. Just 10 years old at the time, Rubin was fortunate to be informally adopted by his father's sister, Jennie Adams, and raised by her and her husband, Earl, in Centralia. His name was officially changed to Robert Jarvis Adams.
Although Bob went to high school and college in Centralia, he was actually majoring in saddle bronc and bull riding at Northwest rodeos! His proudest moments were when he was 17, in 1935, and won "All-Around Cowboy" at Tenino, WA, and when he made the Pendleton, OR Roundup finals in 1937. His proudest possession was a 1933 letter from Will James, complimenting him on his sketchings of bucking broncos.
Bob and his good friend, Bob Bradley, operated the Two Bobs Riding Academy in Centralia, did a series of riding parties in 1938 and got started playing polo there in 1939. In 1940, he met someone who actually took his mind off horses - Mayme Nelson. They were married in her family's church at Monitor, OR, on Christmas Day 1941.
With World War II going on, they moved to Portland, OR, where Bob did welding on the famous Liberty ships in Portland shipyards. Mayme was part of the "Rosie the Riveter" gang and worked on aircraft tail sections. While there, they met Wayne and Rosie Largent, becoming friends and, years later, business partners in Sandy's Place at Winchester.
There was more than military production going on. They produced a daughter, Joanne, in 1943, and a son, Lyle, in 1946. Bob served in the Army from July 15, 1944, to Aug. 17, 1946, and was a staff sergeant in the occupation forces in Japan.
Winchester beckoned in 1946 and the Adams and Largent families joined up to flip hamburgers at Sandy's Place and shovel tons of snow. Bob made all that snow more fun by using a horse and rope to pull his kids around Winchester roads on sleds and skis. Winchester had wonderful people and Bob would move back there to spend his last years. But it was time for a family move to Lewiston in 1957. (Less snow?)
A little lost about what to do next, Bob became a "jack of all trades." He graduated from the Reisch American School of Auctioneering in Iowa in 1958, did some log scaling and welding, and was always buying and selling horses. He co-owned a Lewiston Texaco service station and spent about a year running a cattle ranch on Chirikof Island, AK.
When he returned from Alaska in 1963, he and Mayme divorced and Bob became even more of a gypsy. He worked on ranches in the San Juan Islands, near Orofino and all along the Salmon and Snake rivers - much like Will James claimed he did in his "Lone Cowboy" autobiography. He did a few non-cowboy things during that period, like rafting with his son Lyle. But even then, he threw in a touch of rodeo by pretending he was riding a bucking bronc each time the raft hit rough water!
Thank goodness someone else came along who could actually take his mind off horses! Bob had moved back to Winchester and Betty Fine lived next door. She had being an artist and loving the open road in common with him, so he took a second chance at happiness and married her in Orofino in 1984. He lucked out and got two stepdaughters, Scotty and Linda, who cared for him as though he was their real father too. He was happy.
Bob and Betty did lots of traveling down roads, artwork, fishing and looking everywhere for old saddles, bridles, etc., for Bob to saddle-soap and repair well into his late 80s.
But Bob's body was outliving his mind. Old age, in the form of dementia, took so many things away from him. Taking away his ability to drive was the worst. "On the Road Again" could have been written about him. Escaping from life's harsh realities through reading, drinking, sketching, riding horses and driving was getting harder to do.
As Bob neared his 91st birthday, hospitals and nursing homes were having to care for him and he made his final escape from old age's downward spiral when he fell. This fall was harder on him than anything any horse or bull had ever thrown at him and he wouldn't be getting back up - and that was a blessing.
His wife of 25 years wrote: "He was a lifetime lover of horses. He will be greatly missed by his wife, Betty Adams, his son, Lyle Adams, and his daughter, Joanne Wilsey. Sleep well, my husband and friend. Love you always." And that just about says it all.
Surviving Bob are his wife, Betty Adams of Winchester; son Lyle Adams of Clarkston, WA; daughter Joanne Wilsey and husband David of Kennewick; WA, stepdaughters Euellene (Scotty) Deeney of Heber Springs, AR, and Linda Adams of Estes Park, CO; grandson Chad and Jodi Adams of Bend, OR, and their children Porter and Sonny; and granddaughter Melanie and Gus Monson of Bothell, WA, and their children Kylie and Taylor.
Cremation has taken place and there will be no service, due to his wishes. Condolences may be sent to the Adams home, Box 174, Winchester, ID 83555. Memorial donations may be made to Winchester Library Friends, P.O. Box 157, Winchester. The library was a godsend since Bob was such an avid reader.
Vassar Rawls Funeral Home cared for the arrangements.

Eugene C. Fowler, 84
Eugene C. Fowler, 84, of Grangeville, passed away Monday, Aug. 24, 2009, at the Idaho State Veterans Home in Lewiston.
Eugene was born Nov. 11, 1924 in Luxora , AR, to Emery Martin and Lelar Gay Fowler.
Eugene came to Idaho with the Civilian Conservation Corp from Minnesota and was stationed at Camp O'Hara in Idaho County, working on various Forest Service projects. After leaving the CCC's, he worked for the Forest Service on the Moose Creek Ranger District as a telephone lineman and smoke chaser. It was from these duties in the late spring of 1943, that he was summoned by his friends and neighbors to Spokane, WA and inducted into the U.S. Army. His basic and advanced Infantry training was at Fort Bragg, NC; then to England aboard the HMS Aquatainia, landing in Cardiff, Wales; then to Devon, southwest England and there joining the 29th Infantry Division, (the Blue and the Gray ). On the June 6, 1944, the 29th landed on Omaha Beach, Normandy, France, they worked their way through St. Lo, Brest, Le Mans, Aachen, the Cologne Plaines and then the River Elbe by April 26, 1945. Eugene was awarded several medals and decorations for his service to his country.
On Dec. 14, 1942, he married Edith Elizabeth Davis in Orofino. They had five children, Martin, Reginald Owen, Bill, Lelar, and Julie. Eugene was devoted to his wife and their family. In 1956, the family moved to Grangeville.
After the war, Eugene returned to the States and went to work for the "American Telephone and Telegraph Company" where he started out as a cable splicer's helper in West Memphis, AR. They moved to Clarkston, WA where he worked on a construction crew for the R.E.A. until his telephone company transfer came through and he reported for work in Ephrata, WA as a telephone installer and central office repairman. In 1955, he was transferred to Lewiston and in 1956, was assigned a three-year hardship tour (it was considered tough then, living at the edge of the world) in Grangeville, where he fell in love with the community and the area and never left. He worked for the next 28 years as the Camas Prairie area Central Office Repairman, retiring in 1985. He took Grangeville from the friendly telephone operator asking "number please" to one of the most modern "CrossBar" telephone offices in the state. Eugene was always proud of his work with the telephone company and his service to his country.
After Eugene retired from the telephone company, he and Edith enjoyed traveling in their motor home and going for walks in the mountains. Eugene enjoyed hunting, fishing and carpentry projects.
Eugene is survived by three sisters, Mary Mildred Barger, Hattie Modean Philyaw, and Rita Mae Hudgins all of Arkansas; two sons , Martin and Anna Marie Fowler of Cottonwood, and Bill and Helen Fowler of Grangeville; two daughters, Lelar and Mark Gravatt of Grangeville, and Julie and Boyd Hopkins of White Bird; five grandchildren, Jeff and Kami Fowler Shadley, Rayna Gravatt M.D., Joe and Amy Fowler, Jake and Jessie Gravatt Hackford, and Marcus Gravatt; three great-grandchildren, Justin and Katelyn Shadley and Alexander Hackford; one step great-grandchild, Adam Fowler; and numerous nieces, nephews, cousins and friends.
Eugene was preceded in death by his wife Edith; his parents; an infant son, Reginald Owen; brothers, Jesse Royce Fowler, James Dudley Fowler and Herbert Johnston Fowler; and sisters, Nita Fae Fowler, Jewel Alene Hightower and Judy Irene Chumley.
Cremation has taken place and at his request, no formal services will be held at this time. A graveside memorial service will be held in the near future.
In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Idaho State Veterans Home in Lewiston.
Arrangements are under the direction of the Blackmer Funeral Home in Grangeville.

Annette Blanche Plank, 80, Orofino
Annette Blanche Plank 80, Orofino, passed away at her residence Saturday, Aug. 29, 2009.
A graveside service will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday Sept. 5 at the Orofino Riverside Cemetery. A gathering of family and friends will follow at her home.
Concurrent with her graveside service, there will also be one held for Earl B. Plank.
Pine Hills Funeral Chapel is caring for arrangements.

Norma H. Mittendorf, 89
Norma J. Mittendorf, beloved mother of six children, died Monday, Aug. 24, 2009, at Life Care Center in Lewiston, after many years of debilitating back and leg pain. She was 89.
Born at home in Missoula, MT, on June 29, 1920, Norma was the youngest of Alice and Andrew Nagle's three daughters. Her two older sisters, Julia and Thelma, preceded her in death. Her school years were spent in Butte, MT, where she met and later married George A. Mittendorf on Feb. 11, 1937.
The couple's early married years found them in Montana and Missouri, George's home state, where they were co-owners of The Ozark Playground, a large and well-known dance hall and service station. They also lived in Oregon and Washington, where they owned and operated a small fleet of dump trucks.
It was a flip of a coin that brought them and their four small children - Shirley, Ken, Ted and Tim - to Idaho in 1945, to the 640-acre ranch they had bought on a whim, virtually sight unseen. This ranch, located between the Sunnyside Bench Road and Cavendish outside Orofino, became home to the family. Registered Hereford cattle and hogs were raised as well as alfalfa hay and wheat. Sons Jack and Brad were born during these ranching days. George continued to work his trucking business to help support his growing family, which included his wife, six children, father, and hired man.
Lewiston has been home to the Mittendorfs since 1956, after selling the ranch, except for four years spent in Canyonville, OR, while George was building roads with his trucks in the southern Oregon area. He preceded his wife in death in 1985.
Norma enjoyed reading, working in her yard, line-dancing with her friends at the Lewiston Senior Center and traveling with her daughter, Shirley, and others. She participated in the Oregon Trail Tour; cruised through the Panama Canal; sailed Alaskan glacier-filled waters; line-danced aboard a Mexican Riviera cruise; saw the beauty of Hawaii with her son, Ken, now deceased; and sipped champagne after an exhilarating hot-air balloon ride in Oregon's lovely Willamette Valley on her 78th birthday in 1998.
Due to a serious back problem and the inability to walk without assistance, Norma was admitted to an assisted living facility in 1999 and to Life Care Center in 2005, remaining there until her death.
Survivors include a daughter, Shirley A. LeBlanc of Oak Harbor, WA; four sons, Ted G. Mittendorf of Yuma, AZ, Tim C. Mittendorf of Port Orchard, WA, Jack D. Mittendorf of Clarkston, WA, and Brad Mittendorf of Winchester; seven grandchildren and six great-grandchildren.
Services will be conducted at 10 a.m. Saturday at Vassar-Rawls Funeral Home in Lewiston, with the Rev. Richard Pogue officiating. Burial will follow at Normal Hill Cemetery in Lewiston.
Public thanks to Life Care Center for the wonderful care she received.

David Wallace Durham, 84, Weippe
David Wallace Durham, 84, Weippe, passed away Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2009, at Clearwater Valley Hospital in Orofino.
A memorial service will be held at 10 a.m. Monday, Aug. 31st, at Pine Hills Funeral Chapel in Orofino.
Pine Hills Funeral Chapel is caring for arrangements.

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